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Reblogged from ibmsocialbiz  29 notes
ibmsocialbiz:

Customer experience is a critical discipline
Physician Jeffrey Burns, Chief of Critical Care at Boston Children’s Hospital, speaking at IBM Connect in Orlando, Fla, said “Nothing breaks down borders better than caring for critically ill children.” His address was part of an IBM announcement of a new consulting practice, IBM Interactive Experience.
(via IBM Launches New Global Customer Experience Consultancy #IBMConnect)

ibmsocialbiz:

Customer experience is a critical discipline

Physician Jeffrey Burns, Chief of Critical Care at Boston Children’s Hospital, speaking at IBM Connect in Orlando, Fla, said “Nothing breaks down borders better than caring for critically ill children.” His address was part of an IBM announcement of a new consulting practice, IBM Interactive Experience.

(via IBM Launches New Global Customer Experience Consultancy #IBMConnect)

Reblogged from fastcompany  57 notes
fastcompany:



Troy Carter couldn’t get Gaga’s first single “Just Dance” on pop radio, so in 2008 he put his new act on a rigorous schedule—sometimes four shows a night, playing to gay clubs or arty fashion crowds. Gaga and Carter began experimenting with Twitter and Facebook, engaging fans and pumping out homespun content on YouTube. At the time, these channels were seen as enemies to the music business, but Carter saw them as inexpensive ways to reach the masses.
As he did this, he became fascinated with how tech companies approach industries outside of their core—whether it was Amazon with data storage or Google with YouTube. “These are businesses that you can’t quite define and mean something different to different people,” he says. "I said, ‘We’re doing it totally wrong down here [in Hollywood].’" 

Fired by Lady Gaga (and loving it)

fastcompany:

Troy Carter couldn’t get Gaga’s first single “Just Dance” on pop radio, so in 2008 he put his new act on a rigorous schedule—sometimes four shows a night, playing to gay clubs or arty fashion crowds. Gaga and Carter began experimenting with Twitter and Facebook, engaging fans and pumping out homespun content on YouTube. At the time, these channels were seen as enemies to the music business, but Carter saw them as inexpensive ways to reach the masses.

As he did this, he became fascinated with how tech companies approach industries outside of their core—whether it was Amazon with data storage or Google with YouTube. “These are businesses that you can’t quite define and mean something different to different people,” he says. "I said, ‘We’re doing it totally wrong down here [in Hollywood].’" 

Fired by Lady Gaga (and loving it)

Reblogged from peterspear  1 note

One of the things I teach is the importance of sizing your market. This is not just a financial exercise, but an exercise in stepping outside of your own preconceptions, of approaching a problem rationally. It counteracts the tendency to think that just because a problem is important to you, then it’s an important problem. Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn’t. You need to do a bunch of stuff to find out, and market sizing is one of the cheapest, quickest and least painful things in that bunch of stuff. By Jerry Neumann “Teaching Entrepreneurship” (via peterspear)